What are the Classes of Felonies in Arizona?

What are the Classes of Felonies in Arizona?

When you are charged with a felony in Arizona, it is important to understand how that felony is classified and what it could mean to you if convicted. Even more important is to obtain a good Arizona criminal defense lawyer who can help you. Contact our law firm immediately if you have been charged with a crime of any type in Arizona.

What is a Felony?

What are the Classes of Felonies in ArizonaFelonies are serious crimes, and are viewed by the criminal justice system accordingly. They are usually punishable by at least 12 months in jail. Some felonies are restricted by a statute of limitations. This means that the state of Arizona has a limited time to prosecute a person for the crime after the crime has been committed. Serious felonies like murder, however, have no statute of limitations. A person can be tried at any time after the crime was committed when it comes to a serious felony.

What Happens If I Am Convicted of a Felony in Arizona?

If you are convicted of a felony in Arizona, you will likely have to serve jail time. When you are released from incarceration, you might not be able to purchase a firearm, obtain certain types of licenses and, thus, work certain types of jobs. This is just one more reason why you need a good Arizona criminal defense lawyer on your side if you are charged with a felony in the state. Contact our lawyers today. We can help you to achieve the best possible outcome in your criminal case.

How are Felonies Classified in Arizona?

Arizona classifies felonies into six categories, with Class 1 being the most serious and Class 6 the least serious:

Class 1 Felony

Class 1 felonies are the most serious crimes in Arizona. They include:

  • Murder in the first degree – possible sentences include life in prison without parole or death penalty
  • Murder in the second degree – possible sentences include up to 25 years in prison

Class 2 Felony

Class 2 felonies are the second most serious crimes in Arizona. A complete list of all felonies, including Class 2 felonies, can be found here. Class 2 felonies include (but are not limited to):

  • Attempt of a Class 1 felony
  • Manslaughter
  • Producing child pornography
  • Drive by shooting
  • Sex trafficking
  • Sexual assault
  • Aggravated assault
  • Discharging a firearm at a residence

The minimum sentence for a Class 2 felony in Arizona is three years in prison. If the crime is considered to be aggravated, however, it can be 12.5 years in prison.

Class 3 Felony

The minimum sentence for a Class 3 felony is two years. They include (but are not limited to):

  • Discharging a firearm at a non-residential structure
  • Attempt of a Class 2 felony
  • Solicitation of a Class 1 felony
  • Sexual abuse of a person under 15 years of age
  • Burglary in the second degree
  • Aggravated criminal damage
  • Aggravated taking the identity of another person/entity
  • Trafficking in stolen property

Class 4 Felony

The sentence for a Class 4 felony is usually between one and 3.75 years. They include (but are not limited to):

  • Theft of protective native plants
  • Racing violations
  • Attempt of a Class 3 felony
  • Solicitation of a Class 2 felony
  • Negligent homicide
  • Unlawfully obtaining labor or services
  • Criminal damage over $10,000
  • Arson

Class 5 Felony

The minimum sentence for a Class 5 felony is six months in prison. They include (but are not limited to):

  • Sale of livestock without lawful brand, bill of sale or power of attorney
  • Attempt of a Class 4 felony
  • Solicitation of a Class 3 felony
  • Facilitation of a Class 1 felony
  • Fleeing/attempting to elude a law enforcement officer
  • Watercraft collision, failure to stop
  • Unlawfully administering alcohol or drugs to a minor
  • Public sexual indecency to a minor

Class 6 Felony

A Class 6 felony is punishable by a sentence of four months to two years in prison. They include (but are not limited to):

  • Attempt of a Class 5 felony
  • Solicitation of a Class 4 felony
  • Facilitation of a Class 2 or 3 felony
  • Violating a restraining order or other court order
  • Unauthorized practice of immigration and naturalization law
  • Unlawful imprisonment
  • Aggravated criminal damage
  • Issuing a bad check over $5000
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